Televangelist Pat Robertson Blames COVID-19 On Abortions And Same Sex Marriage
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Televangelist Pat Robertson Blames COVID-19 On Abortions And Same Sex Marriage

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The controversial televangelist Pat Robertson recently told his viewers that same-sex marriage was to blame for the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. During an episode of his show “The 700 Club,” Robertson repeatedly suggested that coronavirus pandemic is a punishment from God. Robertson said that humanity is being punished for our “wicked ways” and said that the virus will not go away until people repent and change the ways that they are living.

Abortion and same-sex marriage appeared to be among the top concerns of the televangelist and his viewers.

Things got interesting when a viewer called into the show and asked if people in same-sex marriages, those who get abortions and those who have a problem with Israel are preventing God from healing the world.

“How can God heal our land and forgive the sins when abortion and same-sex marriage are laws and many people are anti-Israel. Doesn’t this prevent his healing and forgiveness?” the caller asked.

Robertson agreed with the caller, and used her comments to launch into a tirade about how God will not heal people because they have done “terrible things” and have broken a “covenant with God.”

“You know, I think you put your finger on something very important. We are not turning when we have done terrible things. We have broken the covenant that God made with mankind. We have violated his covenant. We have taken the life of the innocent, slaughtered them by the tens of millions. Children made in the image of God … I mean, we’ve allowed this terrible plague to spread throughout our society,” he said.

“And it’s a small wonder God would hold us guilty. But the answer is, you know, you confess your sins and forsake them. Then he heals the land. It’s not before. You are right,” he added

Robertson’s comments sparked outrage among liberal activists and advocates for the communities mentioned in his broadcast. However, Robertson is no stranger to controversy, in fact, he has built much of his business on it, and these types of comments are fairly common on his show.

When high profile tragedies happen in the news, Robertson often takes the opportunity to tie in his fire and brimstone sermons, which typically sparks controversy. Similar comments were made on his broadcast after the world trade center attacks of 2001 and the Pulse night club shootings that happened just a few years ago, each time sparking similar outrage.

The 700 Club is the flagship television program of the Christian Broadcasting Network and it has been in production since 1966. Despite the changing times, the show is still widely popular, with an estimated 650,000 viewers every single day.

televangelist Pat Robertson

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In addition to his politically conservative antics, Robertson is also well-known for his off the wall predictions.

In late 1976, Robertson predicted that the end of the world was coming in October or November 1982. In a May 1980 broadcast of The 700 Club, he stated, “I guarantee you by the end of 1982 there is going to be a judgment on the world.”

Obviously, that apocalypse never came to fruition.

In September 2011, Robertson and several others who incorrectly predicted various dates for the end of the world were awarded an Ig Nobel Prize for “teaching the world to be careful when making mathematical assumptions and calculations”

Mark Horowitz is a graduate of Brandeis University with a degree in political science. Horowitz could have had a job at one of the top media organizations in the United States, but when working as an intern, he found that the journalists in the newsroom were confined by the anxieties and sensibilities of their bosses. Horowitz loved journalism, but wanted more freedom to pursue more complex topics than you would find on the evening news. Around the same time, he began to notice that there was a growing number of independent journalists developing followings online by sharing their in-depth analysis of advanced or off-beat topics. It wasn't long before Horowitz quit his internship with a large New York network to begin publishing his own material online.

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