8 Year-Old Mexican Girl Invents A Solar Water Heater And Wins Nuclear Science Prize
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8 Year-Old Mexican Girl Invents A Solar Water Heater And Wins Nuclear Science Prize

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solar panel
Photo Credit: Alfredo Alvarez, Imagen Television

Xóchitl Guadalupe Cruz, an eight-year-old girl from Chiapas, Mexico, has invented an entirely solar powered device for heating water. To commemorate her amazing invention, this little girl won an award from UNAM’s (National Autonomous University of Mexico) Institute of Nuclear Sciences as reported by Cultura Colectiva.

The invention may seem unnecessary for most of the First World; however, Cruz’s device seeks to reduce deforestation and pollution by replacing the need to cut logs for heating water, which is the primary method used in her part of the world. In keeping with environmentally sound practices, her device utilized recycled as well as recyclable materials.

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Eight-year-old Cruz enjoys participating in science projects and competitions, which led to her working to effect change for her hometown and ultimately throughout the world.

Her solar powered invention will surely improve the quality of life for millions around the world who continue to rely on wood as a source of fuel for heating water, a cumbersome practice. Not only will it reduce the impact this practice has on the environment, but it will also provide millions of people with warm water with which to bathe, clean and cook with ease.

Cruz’s family has already installed her invention on the roof of their home in Mexico, which now provides warm water for them to bathe. She has reported that she takes her baths rather quickly so as to save warm water for her younger brother.

heating water

Photo Credit: Alfredo Alvarez, Imagen Television

This eight-year-old genius is not alone in her endeavors. Many youths throughout the Third world have taken to utilizing science and ingenuity to create inventions aimed at solving many common problems such as the lack of hot water among other things.

One thirteen-year-old from Sierra Leone, by the name of Kelvin Doe, builds generators out of scrap metal.

Emeka Nelson, a young Nigerian man, created a generator which runs entirely on water and powers his two-bedroom apartment.

At Doregos Private Academy, Lagos, Miss Olajumoke Adebayo and Miss Eniola Adewale invented a fuel-less generator.

A group of students from Cambridge University developed a solar powered bakery for equatorial countries called Infinity Bakery. It is made from recycled oil drums, clay, and bamboo.

Fourteen-year-old  Remya Jose, from India, invented a pedal powered washing machine out of recycled bicycle parts. The idea for the invention was sparked when her mother asked her to do the laundry, a task which was quite a time consuming and difficult task in her part of the world.

In Africa, fourteen-year-olds Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, and Faleke Oluwatoyin, and fifteen-year-old Bello, all girls, invented a generator which runs entirely on urine. Their device was displayed at Maker Faire Africa in Lagos, Nigeria, an annual showcase of ingenuity.

The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind is set to be released by Netflix this year. It is a film about thirteen-year-old William Kamkwamba from Malawi, Africa who set out to end famine in his country by developing a wind-powered turbine which intended to help farmers irrigate water for their crops.

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Susan Claire graduated with a degree in microbiology from Ohio State University. Now she lives on the road, in a constant state of travel between research projects and studies. In her free time, she likes to write articles about the most cutting edge inventions, and most recent developments in science.

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