Jim Carrey To “Step Down” As Joe Biden On SNL

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Comedian Jim Carrey announced that he will stop portraying President-elect Joe Biden on Saturday Night Live. He announced on Twitter this week that his time as Biden will be coming to an end.

"Though my term was only meant to be 6 weeks, I was thrilled to be elected as your SNL President... comedy’s highest call of duty," he wrote on Saturday. "I would love to go forward knowing that Biden was the victor because I nailed that sh*t. But I am just one in a long line of proud, fighting SNL Bidens!"

Carrey made his debut as Biden on Oct. 3. During the episode, Carrey's Biden debated Alec Baldwin as Donald Trump. Maya Rudolph's also made an appearance as Kamala Harris.

Carrey has been showing his own political cartoon drawings since August 2017, including controversial renderings of then-White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and President Donald Trump.

Throughout four decades on air, Saturday Night Live has received a number of awards, including 71 Primetime Emmy Awards, four Writers Guild of America Awards, and two Peabody Awards.

In 2000, it was inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. It was ranked tenth in TV Guide's "50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time" list, and in 2007 it was listed as one of Time "100 Best TV Shows of All-TIME."

As of 2018, the show had received 252 Primetime Emmy Award nominations, the most received by any television program.

The live aspect of the show has resulted in several controversies and acts of censorship, with mistakes and intentional acts of sabotage by performers as well as guests.

SNL has aired 897 episodes since its debut, and began its forty-sixth season on October 3, 2020, making it one of the longest-running network television programs in the United States. The show format has been developed and recreated in several countries, meeting with different levels of success.

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Mark Horowitz is a graduate of Brandeis University with a degree in political science. Horowitz could have had a job at one of the top media organizations in the United States, but when working as an intern, he found that the journalists in the newsroom were confined by the anxieties and sensibilities of their bosses. Horowitz loved journalism, but wanted more freedom to pursue more complex topics than you would find on the evening news. Around the same time, he began to notice that there was a growing number of independent journalists developing followings online by sharing their in-depth analysis of advanced or off-beat topics. It wasn't long before Horowitz quit his internship with a large New York network to begin publishing his own material online.