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Woman Killed By Rapist After Man Released Due To Virus Concerns

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In a shocking horrific series of events an alleged rapist was released from jail and then went on to murder his accuser, over concerns he and his lawyers would contract CV.

Washington Post reports, Ibrahim Bouaichi hunted down and murdered his accuser, Karla Dominguez, after the man was released from jail because of concerns the virus would put him and his lawyers at risk of infection. Bouaichi was indicted on charges of rape, strangulation, and abduction after Dominguez, told law enforcement in Alexandria, Va., that he sexually assaulted her in October.

Eleven days after his indictment, Bouaichi turned himself into authorities, and a judge ordered him to be held without bail. Bouaichi’s lawyers requested a bond, arguing their client could not be safe from the virus because it was “impossible” to provide adequate social distancing and other safety measures in prison. The lawyers also added that the arrangement would put them at risk, explaining that lawyers seeking a contact visit would “also expose themselves to contaminated air and surfaces.”

It’s important to note that Dominguez testified against Bouaichi in December shortly before the pandemic hit.

Yet, despite objections from an Alexandria prosecutor and Virginia law itself that states those charged with violent crimes like rape are presumed to be a danger and not eligible for bond, Bouaichi’s lawyers successfully argued for his release on a $25,000 bond. Circuit Court Judge Nolan Dawkins released Bouaichi with the condition that he only leave his Maryland home, where he lives with his parents, to meet with lawyers or pretrial services officials.

However, on a fateful July 29th morning, Alexandria police express Bouaichi returned to Alexandria and shot and killed Dominguez outside her apartment in the city’s West End. Alexandria police state they received a report of gunshots on July 29th, at 6:20 am. Authorities found Dominguez outside her apartment, dead with multiple gunshot wounds on her upper torso.

Police then issued a video news release asking for the public’s help in locating Bouaichi. Exactly one week later, federal marshals and Alexandria police spotted Bouaichi and pursued him in a car chase that ended in the suspect’s car crashing. Authorities uncovered Bouaichi in the wreck with an alleged self-inflicted gunshot wound. Bouaichi was listed in critical condition at a Virginia hospital.

Judge Dawkins retired in June months after ordering the release of Bouaichi and there has been no accountability for the dangerous action, that he ordered despite prosecutors arguing for the man to stay behind prison walls.

Bouiachi’s lawyers, who were selfishly valuing their own safety over Dominguez, 11 Alive reported in a statement they were “certainly saddened by the tragedy both families have suffered here,” despite it being unknown whether the Dominguez family is even aware she was slaughtered. The lawyers also said they “were looking forward to trial. Unfortunately, the pandemic continued the trial date by several months and we didn’t get the chance to put forth our case.”

Since the pandemic began, various state leaders have advocated for the release of thousands of incarcerated people in order to keep prisoners from being infected, while at the same time releasing violent criminals some of which are a public safety risk to be let out. Fox News reports that California is thinking of releasing a total of 17,600 inmates who are locked up for various violent crimes.

Very little is known about Dominguez, who police told reporters was a native of Venezuela and did not have family in the U.S. A GoFundMe fundraiser has raised over $10,000 to cover Dominguez’ tragic loss of her life for funeral costs.

Alex Baldridge is an activist and freelance journalist from the midwestern United States who was inspired to become a writer after watching the development of the Wikileaks story and the persecution of Julian Assange. Alex is especially interested in topics like surveillance, the rise of automation, foreign policy, prison reform, and the legal system.

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