Cop Says Woman He Killed Threatened To Shoot Him But No Gun Was Found
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Cop Says Woman He Killed Threatened To Shoot Him But No Gun Was Found

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A 25-year-old woman named Hannah Fizer was shot and killed by a police officer last week during a traffic stop in Missouri. The police report states that Fizer was pulled over because she was speeding and ran a red light, but somehow the situation escalated moments after the officer approached her car.

The incident happened in Sedalia, a small city of 21,700 residents, which is located about 90 miles southeast of Kansas City.

The officer responsible for the shooting has not been named, but he claims that Fizer was belligerent with him and refused to identify herself. He also says that she threatened to shoot him. However, when police searched her vehicle, no gun was found.

Hannah Fizer

The officer who shot Fizer works with the Pettis County Sheriff’s Office, but the investigation has been taken over by the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

Unfortunately, there is no body camera footage to verify the officer’s side of the story, nor is there any dash camera footage.

Fizer’s family and friends are having a hard time believing the version of events given by the officer. They say that she was a friendly person, and has always been compliant in her previous interactions with police. They also said that weapons were not a part of her life.

Sedalia community protests following death of unarmed woman

Hannah Fizer, 25, was shot and killed by a Pettis County sheriff's deputy during a traffic stop on Saturday night. The sheriff's office said she threatened to shoot the deputy, but now investigators say there wasn't a weapon in her car.Our 41 Action News – KSHB-TV story :https://www.kshb.com/news/crime/sedalia-community-protests-following-death-of-unarmed-woman

Posted by Andres Gutierrez on Tuesday, June 16, 2020

John Fizer, Hannah’s father said that his daughter liked to party, but she was not violent.

She was not a perfect angel by any means. She liked to drink and smoke a little weed sometimes, but by no means was she violent. She was the kind of person that wouldn’t hesitate to give a homeless person $10,” Fizer told KMBC.

Fizer also said that his daughter respected the police, and actually expressed interest in having a career in law enforcement at one point.

The only witnesses to the incident were at a nearby hotel when the shots rang out, and while at least one witness tried to see what happened, they didn’t get to the scene until Fizer’s body was being covered by a sheet.

One of the witnesses said that he heard the officer yell “stop,” before firing his gun five times into Fizer’s car.

The county sheriff, Kevin Bond, is standing by his officer and believing his side of the story, despite the fact that parts of his story now seem doubtful since no weapon was found.

Bond also said that he would not tolerate his small town to be a “test project for some social justice experiment in rural America.”

The officer, who has been on the force since 2007, has been suspended until the investigation is finished. Bond says that the officer has not had any excessive force complaints or shootings during his career.

This is just one of many suspicious wrongful deaths that have taken place at the hands of police in the United States in recent weeks. Police accountability activists say that this is an everyday occurrence in the country, but now extra attention is being given to the policing problem in the wake of nationwide protests.

Hannah Fizer, 25, was killed Saturday night in Sedalia, Missouri driving to her job as an assistant manager at a convenience store. She was pulled over because she was ran a red light while speeding and kept going as the deputy tried to stop her, patrol Sgt. Bill Lowe said Monday.“The suspect allegedly threatened the deputy by stating she was armed and going to shoot him,” the patrol said in a news release. “The incident escalated and the deputy discharged his weapon, striking the suspect.”There was no available dashboard camera or body camera footage of the shooting. The county sheriff, Kevin Bond, said his department doesn't have or use such technology.

Posted by David Handy on Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Mark Horowitz is a graduate of Brandeis University with a degree in political science. Horowitz could have had a job at one of the top media organizations in the United States, but when working as an intern, he found that the journalists in the newsroom were confined by the anxieties and sensibilities of their bosses. Horowitz loved journalism, but wanted more freedom to pursue more complex topics than you would find on the evening news. Around the same time, he began to notice that there was a growing number of independent journalists developing followings online by sharing their in-depth analysis of advanced or off-beat topics. It wasn't long before Horowitz quit his internship with a large New York network to begin publishing his own material online.

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