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Osama Bin Laden’s Niece Warns If Trump Loses There Could Be Another 911

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In a bizarre interview with the New York Post, Osama Bin Laden’s niece, Noor bin Ladin, warns that if Donald Trump loses the election against Joe Biden another 9/11-style attack may be just around the corner.

“ISIS proliferated under the Obama/Biden administration, leading to them coming to Europe. Trump has shown he protects America and us by extension from foreign threats by obliterating terrorists at the root and before they get a chance to strike,” Noor, 33, told NY Post.

It’s of interesting note that Noor spells her last name differently than Osama. Noor instead uses Bin Ladin as opposed to the “e” in the name, Bin Laden. Noor calls the election the most important in a generation. Despite living in Switzerland and not being American. However, Noor says and is convinced that Trump helps protect foreign countries from Jihadists as well.

“I have been a supporter of President Trump since he announced he was running in the early days in 2015. I have watched from afar and I admire this man’s resolve,” she said. “He must be reelected … It’s vital for the future of not only America, but western civilization as a whole.”

“You look at all the terrorist attacks that have happened in Europe over the past 19 years. They have completely shaken us to the core … [Radical Islam] has completely infiltrated our society,” Noor continued. “In the US it’s very worrying that the left has aligned itself completely with the people who share that ideology.”

Noor also mentioned Rep. Ilhan Omar and how she had urged her home state to give “compassionate sentences” to 13 suspected ISIS recruits plotting terror attacks in the U.S. “You do have a situation now in America where you have people like Ilhan Omar who actively hate your country,” Noor said, expressing how Omar had urged “compassionate” sentences for 13 ISIS recruits busted in Omar’s home state of Minnesota.

Noor stated to the NYPost that she was just 14 years old when her uncle Osama Bin Laden committed the deadliest attack on U.S. soil in history. “I was so devastated,” she said remembering the day. “I had been going to the states with my mom several times a year from the age of three onwards. I considered the US my second home.”

Despite her last name, Noor says that Americans have treated her with respect and have not put blame on her for her uncles’ involvement in the 911 attacks. “I have not had a single bad experience with Americans despite the name that I carry. On the contrary, I was overwhelmed by their kindness and understanding,” she said. Noor added that she’s been back to the U.S. a few .times since the attacks. Although she has never once visited New York City and the memorial for 911 victims. However, she said she would like to add that to her bucket list to pay her respects. “I really want to go and pay my respects.”

Osama bin Laden isn’t the only relative that Noor has lost over the years. In 2015, a plane crashed after it landed too far down the runway in the UK at the Blackbushe airport and caught fire, killing Osama Bin Laden’s brother-in-law, Zuhair Hashim, 56, half-sister, Sana Mohammed Bin Laden, 53, and her mother Raja Bashir Hashim, The Guardian reported.

Further, last year, Noor’s cousin Hamza Bin Laden was killed by the Trump administration in a military operation. This was after Hamza was designated by the U.S. as a global terrorist two years ago due to public comments stating he was one of the new Al-Qaeda leaders and calling for attacks on the U.S. and other countries.

“The loss of Hamza Bin Laden not only deprives al-Qaeda of important leadership skills and the symbolic connection to his father, but undermines important operational activities of the group,” Trump said at the time.

 

Alex Baldridge is an activist and freelance journalist from the midwestern United States who was inspired to become a writer after watching the development of the Wikileaks story and the persecution of Julian Assange. Alex is especially interested in topics like surveillance, the rise of automation, foreign policy, prison reform, and the legal system.

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