A Mosquito-Born Illness That Causes Brain Swelling Found In Florida
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A Mosquito-Born Illness That Causes Brain Swelling Found In Florida

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floridahealth.gov

Residents in the state of Florida are being warned that a very serious mosquito-borne virus is spreading in the area. The virus reportedly causes brain swelling and could be potentially fatal.

According to The Florida Department of Health in Orange County, several sentinel chickens in the same flock have tested positive “Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEE),” which causes brain swelling and could take a person’s life if they are not careful.

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“The Department continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito-borne illnesses, including West Nile virus infections, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria, chikungunya and dengue,” the health department said.

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Photo Credit: Ksat

Physical symptoms for the infection include chills, fever, headache, vomiting, malaise, muscle aches and joint aches, and in more serious cases can lead to disorientation, seizures or coma.

People usually develop symptoms from the virus about 4 to 10 days after they are bitten by an infected mosquito.

The Orange County Department of health is telling residents to be very careful around mosquitos, and do their best to wear mosquito repellant and other preventative measures.

Mosquito

Photo Credit: Twiter @DohOrange

This also includes sleeping with the doors and windows shut, since mosquitos are most active at night when we are most vulnerable. It is also a good idea to drain and cover any standing water that might be on your property.

Mosquitos also like to gather around swimming pools, so pool owners are being instructed to keep them properly chlorinated and in good condition.

The Centers for Disease Control have noted that the disease is very rare, and contracted by humans “relatively infrequently.” Typically, there is usually an average of around 7 people each year infected with the virus, but with how potentially deadly the disease can be, there is certainly a cause for concern.

Experts warn that roughly 30% of people who contract the disease end up passing away. Sadly, those who survive typically end up with “mild to severe brain damage.”

Thus far, most cases of the virus have been reported in Florida, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina.

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Michelle Williams is a New York native and Cornell University alumni currently living in Los Angeles and working as a journalist for numerous Midialab ventures. Williams began her career working as a copy editor for a large television production firm and then moved on to entertainment writing after developing some industry contacts in LA.

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