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Horrific Video Shows Moment Second Plane Hits World Trade Center Towers On 9/11

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A horrific video clip was taken of the second plane crashing into the world trade center towers nearly two decades ago. The video was taken by Caroline Dries, who was a  New York University student at the time. She took the video from her dorm room at the university on the 32nd floor.

Caroline and her roommate were woken up just before 9am by the sound of an explosion, which was the first airplane hitting the tower. She knew that something important was happening so she began filming right away.

The two women were watching the scene unfold and wondering what was happening, but once the second plane hit they realized that terrorists could be responsible for the attack.

“It’s terrorists…what do we do?” one of the girls can be heard shouting.

After leaving their dorm one of the girls can be heard saying, “I don’t want to be on the 32nd floor of this building any more.”

After graduating, Caroline went on to become a successful television producer who worked on hit shows like Smallville and The Vampire Diaries.

The video can be seen below:

On that day nearly twenty years ago, four passenger airliners were hijacked. Two of the planes, American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175, crashed into the North and South towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. Within an hour and 42 minutes, both 110-story towers collapsed. A third plane, American Airlines Flight 77, later crashed into the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia, which led to a partial collapse of the building’s west side. The fourth plane, United Airlines Flight 93, was initially flown toward Washington, D.C., but crashed into a field in Stonycreek Township, Pennsylvania, because passengers revolted.

The attacks resulted in 2,977 fatalities, over 25,000 injuries, and numerous long-term health consequences for first responders. 9/11 is recognized the single deadliest terrorist attack in human history and the single deadliest incident for firefighters and law enforcement officers in the history of the United States, with 343 and 72 killed. Other buildings nearby, such as the World Trade Center building 7.

Weeks after the attack, the death count was estimated to be over 6,000, which is more than twice the number of deaths eventually confirmed. The city was only able to identify remains for about 1,600 of the World Trade Center victims. The medical examiner’s office collected “about 10,000 unidentified bone and tissue fragments that cannot be matched to the list of the dead”.

Bone fragments were still being found in 2006 by workers who were preparing to demolish the damaged Deutsche Bank Building. In 2010, a team of anthropologists and archaeologists searched for human remains and personal items at the Fresh Kills Landfill, where 72 more traces of human remains were recovered, bringing the total found to 1,845. DNA profiling continues in an attempt to identify additional victims. The remains are currently being held in storage in Memorial Park, outside the New York City Medical Examiner’s facilities.

The attacks were quickly blamed on terrorists in the Middle East, and the US government began multiple wars that are still taking place today.

Mark Horowitz is a graduate of Brandeis University with a degree in political science. Horowitz could have had a job at one of the top media organizations in the United States, but when working as an intern, he found that the journalists in the newsroom were confined by the anxieties and sensibilities of their bosses. Horowitz loved journalism, but wanted more freedom to pursue more complex topics than you would find on the evening news. Around the same time, he began to notice that there was a growing number of independent journalists developing followings online by sharing their in-depth analysis of advanced or off-beat topics. It wasn't long before Horowitz quit his internship with a large New York network to begin publishing his own material online.

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