Actor Randy Quaid Claims Hollywood Assassins Killed Heath Ledger

2085 views

Former actor Randy Quaid has and his wife, Evi Quaid, claimed that a group of Hollywood assassins killed Heath Ledger, and indicated that Britney Spears may be one of their next targets. They have called these assassins the "Hollywood Star Whackers."

They say that these assassins work on behalf of a secretive group of Hollywood critics, lawyers, and other insiders who kill or otherwise diminish celebrities that they don't like. David Carradine and Heath Ledger are allegedly among their high-profile kills.

There is no public confirmation of the existence of this group, except for a few interviews conducted with the Quaids, which can be seen below, and in a film that they released called "Star Whackers."

The Quaids have reportedly moved to Canada after spending time in prison on felony trespassing and vandalism charges. They both insist that these charges and the other problems that they have faced are connected to this group.

The Quaids were accused of illegally squatting in a Santa Barbara home they’d previously sold, but they gave CBS News a photo of their key in the front door as proof that they still own it.

“Well, they are star whackers. I can’t believe that David would commit suicide. His wife recently has come out and said she doesn’t believe that … that she believes he was murdered. Heath was an athlete. He played Australian football. He was robust. I’ve had eight friends of mine who have either died mysteriously or had scandals surrounding them in recent years, and this is what I’m talking about when I [say] star whacking. I mean, it’s not killing somebody necessarily, it’s just creating a scandal or a mystery around a celebrity that discredits them. And Heath, I think it was possible that he could have taken some tainted prescription drugs, yes,” Quaid said in an interview with CBS News anchor Maggie Rodriguez

Quaid told Rodriguez that he fears for his safety.

“I have … I have a fear … that fear because there, for the last three years and really the last 20 years, there … I’ve been racketeered on. My finances have been decimated by a group of people, such as my ex-attorney, my ex-business manager, and an estate planner, specifically. And they have conspired together to … to co-opt my corporations, put in trustees without my knowledge,” he said.

He said that he believes the group sometimes just creates legal problems for celebrities they want to take down instead of killing them. When asked if he was targeted for death, Quaid said, “Well, yes. I mean, they … not in a … not in a sense where, you know, they’re going to come out and shoot me with a gun or anything like that. But, the way they’ve manipulated the system, the court system to have us falsely arrested and to make it impossible for us to operate on a daily basis in the most basic way. I mean, banking, owning a house, renting a house, renting a car. I mean, we cannot function.”

Quaid was nominated for an Academy Award, BAFTA Award, and a Golden Globe Award for his role in The Last Detail in 1973. In 1978 he co-starred as a prisoner in Midnight Express. he also won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Emmy Award for his portrayal of U.S. President Lyndon Johnson in LBJ: The Early Years (1987).

He also received Emmy nominations for his roles in A Streetcar Named Desire (1984) and Elvis (2005). Quaid is also known for his role of Cousin Eddie in the National Lampoon's Vacation movies. He voiced Alameda Slim in the animated feature Home on the Range (2004).

Author: 
author
Mark Horowitz is a graduate of Brandeis University with a degree in political science. Horowitz could have had a job at one of the top media organizations in the United States, but when working as an intern, he found that the journalists in the newsroom were confined by the anxieties and sensibilities of their bosses. Horowitz loved journalism, but wanted more freedom to pursue more complex topics than you would find on the evening news. Around the same time, he began to notice that there was a growing number of independent journalists developing followings online by sharing their in-depth analysis of advanced or off-beat topics. It wasn't long before Horowitz quit his internship with a large New York network to begin publishing his own material online.